Medieval Carpenters — A Writer’s Perspective

Bradford on Avon Tithe Barn Exterior We’re back with medieval crafts and trades this week, looking at carpenters. There have always been carpenters. Two thousand years ago, Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus, was a carpenter and there were carpenters two thousand years before him. Their craft remained unchanged for centuries. We know that carpentry […]Continue reading “Medieval Carpenters — A Writer’s Perspective”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of October — Allison D. Reid

There is no doubt now, that fall is here. The weather is getting cooler, and the labors of summer have produced an abundant harvest. It is a time of plenty in the medieval world, albeit a cautious one. The harsh winter months are only just ahead, and what has been so carefully grown and collected […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of October — Allison D. Reid”

Tales from the Green Valley

Earlier this month I reblogged Christian Fantasy author Alison D. Reid‘s “Medieval Monday – The Labors of September” which, like many of her “Labors of the Months” posts, featured a timely episode of an excellent documentary series called Tales from the Green Valley, which I might never have known about if not for her blog.Continue reading “Tales from the Green Valley”

Medieval Bills of Exchange — A Writer’s Perspective

Last week there was a question in the comments from Ellen Hawley who wanted to know how the innkeepers who stored and organised the transport of goods on behalf of merchants were paid by those merchants. I touched on this subject a bit when we were looking at how ransoms for prisoners of war were […]Continue reading “Medieval Bills of Exchange — A Writer’s Perspective”

English history: the yeoman — Notes from the U.K.

In the stratified world of medieval England, the yeoman was wedged into a slot between the gentry and the peasants. Then history came along and blurred the categories, leaving confusion in its wake. History will do that if you let it.  Irrelevant photo: foxglove leaves after a frost The hazy definition of a yeoman  One […]Continue reading “English history: the yeoman — Notes from the U.K.”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid

In the Middle Ages, the arrival of June meant not only a change in the weather, but a shift in daily labors, and in what was on the menu to eat. While most crops were harvested much later in the summer, hay was the first to be cut in June, though it was typically poor […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid

Jason looks back at our shield wall experiment day that we filmed in the summer of 2017. We put shieldmaker Luke’s handiwork to the test with a group of twenty brave volunteers, who clashed together in various formations of shield wall. In doing so, we explored some of the events recounted in ancient sagas to […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective

The French attempt to recapture Calais To my immense shame, I have often come across the word ‘staple’ when reading about the Middle Ages and not bothered to find out what it really means. I knew it had something to do with merchants and trade, but I didn’t know the details. Today I’m putting that […]Continue reading “Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective”

Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.

Let’s start in the sixteenth century, when merrie England was still mostly rural and maybe not 100% merrie, since–well, we’ll get to that later. In the meantime, the feudal system was breaking apart and parishes began taking charge of things that the lord of the manor would have done back when feudalism was fully functional […]Continue reading “Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.”