Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid

In the Middle Ages, the arrival of June meant not only a change in the weather, but a shift in daily labors, and in what was on the menu to eat. While most crops were harvested much later in the summer, hay was the first to be cut in June, though it was typically poor […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid

Jason looks back at our shield wall experiment day that we filmed in the summer of 2017. We put shieldmaker Luke’s handiwork to the test with a group of twenty brave volunteers, who clashed together in various formations of shield wall. In doing so, we explored some of the events recounted in ancient sagas to […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective

The French attempt to recapture Calais To my immense shame, I have often come across the word ‘staple’ when reading about the Middle Ages and not bothered to find out what it really means. I knew it had something to do with merchants and trade, but I didn’t know the details. Today I’m putting that […]Continue reading “Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective”

Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.

Let’s start in the sixteenth century, when merrie England was still mostly rural and maybe not 100% merrie, since–well, we’ll get to that later. In the meantime, the feudal system was breaking apart and parishes began taking charge of things that the lord of the manor would have done back when feudalism was fully functional […]Continue reading “Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.”