Medieval Monday: The Labors of May — Allison D. Reid

May Day marks the beginning of summer in the medieval world. The weather is really warming up, and there are lots of new chores to begin. Planting and harrowing continues, and weeding the grain fields becomes an important chore. Cabbages, leeks, onions, and garlic are ready to be planted, as are those plants used in […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of May — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of April — Allison D. Reid

Spring is here! Farm work really gets underway—harrowing and sowing are important chores for this month. Crops planted in April included grains, like barley and oats, and legumes like beans, peas, and vetches. Grain seed was planted by standing with one’s back to the breeze, and flinging a handful of seeds outward from the waist. […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of April — Allison D. Reid”

The Irish at the Gates of Death: 1917 — The Victorian Book of the Dead

In Ireland the living are dominated by the dead to an extent unknown probably in other countries. It is a willing servitude, based upon two powerful sentiments—the constancy of Irish family affection, and their Catholic solicitude for for the eternal welfare of those they love whose mortal existence has been brought to an end. Death, asContinue reading “The Irish at the Gates of Death: 1917 — The Victorian Book of the Dead”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of March — Allison D. Reid

Warmer March weather meant it was time to finally put most indoor tasks aside and get out into the fields. There weren’t a great variety of tasks associated with March, mainly because preparing the fields for plowing and planting was such an onerous chore that began at dawn and ended at dusk.  Getting the spring […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of March — Allison D. Reid”

The Breaking of the Fellowship

This post contains spoilers for both the book and film versions of The Lord of the Rings. I’ve been continuing my re-read of J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, which as I mentioned early on I used to do every year, but if I’m honest haven’t really done since before the releaseContinue reading “The Breaking of the Fellowship”

Medieval Monday: Labors of January — Allison D. Reid

Winter had tightened its grip, and the most important labor of January was staying warm! With only hearth fires for heat, the cold was a very real danger for everyone, but especially the young, the elderly, and the poor. There were still several feasting days to be celebrated, which continued to be a blessing for […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Labors of January — Allison D. Reid”

The Movies and Stories that Inspired Dave Arneson to Invent the Dungeon Crawl — DMDavid

Around 1971 Dave Arneson and his circle of Minneapolis gamers invented games where players controlled individual characters who grew with experience and who could try anything because dice and a referee determined the outcomes. The group tried this style of play in various settings, but Dave invented one that proved irresistible: the dungeon. Dave’s Blackmoor… TheContinue reading “The Movies and Stories that Inspired Dave Arneson to Invent the Dungeon Crawl — DMDavid”

A Brace of Tolkien Posts for his 130th Birthday (#TolkienBirthdayToast) — A Pilgrim in Narnia

As J.R.R. Tolkien was born about 68,374,080 hours ago, the Tolkien Society is once again raising a toast to the Professor on his birthday, 3 January 2022 (see here). After Bilbo left the Shire on his eleventy-first birthday in The Lord of the Rings, Frodo toasted his uncle’s birthday each year, which he shared. Tolkien […]Continue reading “A Brace of Tolkien Posts for his 130th Birthday (#TolkienBirthdayToast) — A Pilgrim in Narnia”

Some Lost Christmas Traditions from Brittany — Bonjour From Brittany

The folk customs and traditions regarding the celebration of Christmas differ from region to region in France, as elsewhere, and those in Brittany were once quite distinctive. Some Lost Christmas Traditions from Brittany — Bonjour From Brittany

Stonehenge’s Builders May Have Feasted on Mince Pies and Sweet Treats — Stonehenge Stone Circle News and Information

Excavations near the iconic English monument revealed traces of fruits and nuts. Excavation work has been led by English Heritage at Durrington Walls, Wiltshire Durrington Walls was inhabited by the builders of Stonehenge in about 2,500 BC Evidence suggests traces of hazelnuts, sloes, apples and other fruits at the site  NEOLITHIC MINCE PIE RECIPE: Download open fire mince […]Continue reading “Stonehenge’s Builders May Have Feasted on Mince Pies and Sweet Treats — Stonehenge Stone Circle News and Information”