Medieval Monday: More Labors of November — Allison D. Reid

November was a busy month in the medieval world. Last week’s post focused mainly on the fall slaughter and preservation of meat for the coming months, but there was much more to be done. Garlic and beans were sown in November–typically around the 20th, which was St. Edmund’s day–but the heavy labors of the […] MedievalContinue reading “Medieval Monday: More Labors of November — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of November — Allison D. Reid

The Anglo Saxons referred to November as the “blood month,” because it was time to begin slaughtering those animals which would not be kept through the winter. The traditional time for butchering animals was Martinmas (November 11th), though the butchering and processing of meat could continue through January depending on the weather. While some meat […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of November — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Fire! Fire! — Allison D. Reid

Fire was crucial to survival in the Middle Ages. With electricity and gas-powered devices still far into the future, open flame was the most common source of heat for cooking, industry, and protection against the cold. Fires were a bit more difficult to set in an era before matches, particularly if everything was wet. Fire-steels, […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Fire! Fire! — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Carpenters — A Writer’s Perspective

Bradford on Avon Tithe Barn Exterior We’re back with medieval crafts and trades this week, looking at carpenters. There have always been carpenters. Two thousand years ago, Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus, was a carpenter and there were carpenters two thousand years before him. Their craft remained unchanged for centuries. We know that carpentry […]Continue reading “Medieval Carpenters — A Writer’s Perspective”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of October — Allison D. Reid

There is no doubt now, that fall is here. The weather is getting cooler, and the labors of summer have produced an abundant harvest. It is a time of plenty in the medieval world, albeit a cautious one. The harsh winter months are only just ahead, and what has been so carefully grown and collected […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of October — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Navigating a Medieval Woodland — Allison D. Reid

Modern woodland is very different from medieval woodland. Jason and Warlord explore the differences and why the wildwood was significant for travel and warfare. Use the Medieval Monday Index to discover other topics relating to daily life in the Middle Ages. Medieval Monday: Navigating a Medieval Woodland — Allison D. Reid

Medieval Monday: The Labors of September — Allison D. Reid

“Now in autumn, in which the fruits of the earth are assembled, is the time of reaping and of the vintage, and it signifies the time of the General Judgment, when every single person will receive the reward for his works.” – Hrabanus Maurus (9th Century Theologian) Summer is nearing its end—can you feel it? […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of September — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of August — Allison D. Reid

The most crucial labor in August was harvesting and threshing the rye and winter wheat, which would have to sustain the community through many months to come. August 1st began the feast of Lammas, when the first grain of the new harvest was consecrated and made into bread for the Eucharist. There would be more […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of August — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid

In the Middle Ages, the arrival of June meant not only a change in the weather, but a shift in daily labors, and in what was on the menu to eat. While most crops were harvested much later in the summer, hay was the first to be cut in June, though it was typically poor […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Making Barrels and Wooden Vessels — Allison D. Reid

Medieval coopers were important craftsmen in the Middle Ages. Many different types of goods were kept in barrels, such as alcohol and salted meats. But barrels were not the only things coopers made. A variety of wooden vessels were needed for daily use by the average person as well as many other medieval craft and […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Making Barrels and Wooden Vessels — Allison D. Reid”