Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid

In the Middle Ages, the arrival of June meant not only a change in the weather, but a shift in daily labors, and in what was on the menu to eat. While most crops were harvested much later in the summer, hay was the first to be cut in June, though it was typically poor […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: The Labors of June — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Making Barrels and Wooden Vessels — Allison D. Reid

Medieval coopers were important craftsmen in the Middle Ages. Many different types of goods were kept in barrels, such as alcohol and salted meats. But barrels were not the only things coopers made. A variety of wooden vessels were needed for daily use by the average person as well as many other medieval craft and […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Making Barrels and Wooden Vessels — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid

Jason looks back at our shield wall experiment day that we filmed in the summer of 2017. We put shieldmaker Luke’s handiwork to the test with a group of twenty brave volunteers, who clashed together in various formations of shield wall. In doing so, we explored some of the events recounted in ancient sagas to […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Battling Against the Shield Wall — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective

The French attempt to recapture Calais To my immense shame, I have often come across the word ‘staple’ when reading about the Middle Ages and not bothered to find out what it really means. I knew it had something to do with merchants and trade, but I didn’t know the details. Today I’m putting that […]Continue reading “Medieval Staples — A Writer’s Perspective”

Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.

Let’s start in the sixteenth century, when merrie England was still mostly rural and maybe not 100% merrie, since–well, we’ll get to that later. In the meantime, the feudal system was breaking apart and parishes began taking charge of things that the lord of the manor would have done back when feudalism was fully functional […]Continue reading “Who policed England before it had police?  — Notes from the U.K.”

Medieval Monday: Cooking Methods (Part 2) — Allison D. Reid

Last week my Medieval Monday post talked about cooking methods without the benefits of a modern kitchen. Today is part two of that post. I previously mentioned a type of earth oven which was really just a pit in the ground, primarily used for things like meat, which could be wrapped up and placed directly […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Cooking Methods (Part 2) — Allison D. Reid”

Medieval Monday: Cooking Methods (Part 1) — Allison D. Reid

We’re pretty used to our modern kitchen conveniences, including our stoves and ovens. But somehow people from the Anglo-Saxon and medieval period managed to make a wide array of dishes and baked goods without them. How did they do it? Managing your fuel supply was a key element.  Cutting and gathering wood was a summer […]Continue reading “Medieval Monday: Cooking Methods (Part 1) — Allison D. Reid”

My Mind Castle is Constantly Besieged

If you’re a fan of, or at least somewhat familiar with, the BBC’s Sherlock you’re probably acquainted with the concept of the Mind Palace. Well, mine is a Mind Castle of the motte and bailey variety. When I think of palaces I think of the fancy dwellings of Disney Princes and Princesses, or of MadContinue reading “My Mind Castle is Constantly Besieged”